YOUR GUIDE TO THE GREATEST CHALLENGE NOW FACING PLANET EARTH

CLIMATE CHANGE

 

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According to NOAA, "global mean sea level has been rising at an average rate of 1 to 2 mm/year over the past 100 years, which is significantly larger than the rate averaged over the last several thousand years. Projected increase from 1990-2100 is anywhere from 0.09-0.88 meters, depending on which greenhouse gas scenario is used and many physical uncertainties in contributions to sea-level rise from a variety of frozen and unfrozen water sources."

In 2007, a United Nations panel of 2500 scientists from 130 countries concluded that as the ice caps melt over the next century, sea levels can be expected to rise 11-17 inches by the year 2100.

As sea levels rise, even smaller, category 2 and 3 hurricanes will probably become much more dangerous and severe when coming ashore in low-lying high-populated areas.  According to the National Environmental Trust, the following cities in the United States are especially threatened by future rising sea levels brought about by global warming:

Major Metro Areas:  Miami, New York City, Washington D.C., Boston

Gulf Coast Towns:  South Padre Island (TX), Biloxi (MS), Galveston (TX)

Northeast Cities and Towns:  Cape Cod (MA), Martha's Vineyard (MA)

Mid-Atlantic Cities and Towns: Chrisfield (MD), Wilmington (DE), Ocean City (MD)

Southeast Cities and Towns:  Tybee Island (GA), Charleston (SC)

Florida:  Clear Water, Fort Meyers, Jacksonville, Key Largo, Key West, Sarasota

 


 

 


        2007 by Bruce Gourley. All rights reserved.