YOUR GUIDE TO THE GREATEST CHALLENGE NOW FACING PLANET EARTH

CLIMATE CHANGE

 

Government Policies

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UNITED NATIONS, PACIFIC PARTNERSHIP, GROUP OF 8

The Kyoto Protocol, or United Nations Climate Change Conference, is the primary avenue through which member nations of the U.N. are working to reduce greenhouse gases.  The second Kyoto meeting was in November 2006, attended by 6000 persons from 180 countries, but not the United States (the Bush administration has expressed no interest in global warming, to the point of altering scientific research to suit its views).  Nonetheless, the U.N. is taking increasing steps to address the problem of global warming through two primary avenues: emissions reductions and global cooperation to address climate change.  U.N. policies include: Emissions Trading, Joint Implementation (two nations sharing emission reduction units), and Clean Development Mechanism (a project-based mechanism where certified projects proposed by developed countries - or companies from those countries - can be used to reduce emissions in developing countries).

In addition, Australia, India, Japan, China, South Korea and the United States (collectively accounting for about half the world's population and more than half of the world's economy, energy use and greenhouse gas emissions) have partnered in the Asia Pacific Partnership (AP6) to reduce for the development and advancement of technologies that promote a cleaner environment.

Also, the Group of 8 (Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, the Russian Federation, the United Kingdom, and the USA) hold yearly economic and political summits of the heads of government with international officials for the purpose of joint economic development, poverty eradication, development of affordable modern energy services, and protecting local and global environmental quality.

AMERICAN CITIES AND STATES

Hundreds of cities in the United States have joined together in the "Cool Cities" program and made commitments to stop global warming by signing the U.S. Mayors Climate Protection Agreement. As of February 2007, 376 mayors have accepted the challenge to address climate disruption.  In addition, more and more states are addressing global warming on the state political level.

 


        2007 by Bruce Gourley. All rights reserved.